Saturday, January 20, 2018 01:11

Archive for the ‘flying’ Category

Just gorgeous.

Saturday, August 9th, 2014

– Wiccapundit

This is a video of Boeing preparing the 787 Dreamliner for the Farnborough Air Show.  Check out the deck angle on takeoff at about 00:30 in the video.  Whoa!  That is impressive.

This is a stark reminder of the difference between civilized people and barbarians.  Americans conceive, design, and build machines such as these.  Barbarians fly them into buildings.

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More cool flying stuff

Tuesday, November 29th, 2011

– Wiccapundit

Moar flyin’!  I want one of these:

And one of these:

And maybe one of these:

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Cast Iron Testicles

Thursday, November 17th, 2011

– Wiccapundit

In Glengarry Glen Ross, Alec Baldwin’s character said: “Do you know what it takes to sell real estate?  It takes brass balls to sell real estate.”

Well, it takes cast iron testicles the size of bowling balls to do this:

Check out the point at 1:15 when he scorches across the ground between two trees just a few feet off the ground.   Seen from a different perspective at 1:47, the guy on the ground actually ducks to avoid being hit!

Honestly, if I was ever diagnosed with an incurable fatal disease, this is what I’d be doing the following weekend.

 

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Gallery of the Intrepid – Women In Aviation Edition

Thursday, September 29th, 2011

– Wiccapundit

In which your Wiccapundit gets to indulge: (1) his love of all things aviation; (2) his respect for people who demonstrate exceptional skills and tremendous achievements; and (3) his appreciation for the lovelier half of the population.

Jackie Cochran is even more awesomer than Teh Awesome.

(Jackie in the cockpit of the F-86 Sabre she used to break the sound barrier; with her friend and wingman Chuck Yeager.  You might have heard of him.)

In her 20’s, the incredible Ms. Cochran learned to fly in just three weeks, and quickly obtained her commercial pilot’s certificate (not “license,” because the FAA doesn’t understand what a “license” is).  She then proceeded to establish, oh, just a few aviation records:

First woman to enter the Bendix Inter-continental Air Race (in 1935).

First woman to break the sound barrier, flying the first production airplane to break the sound barrier (with Chuck Yeager as her wingman).

First woman to fly Mach 2.

First woman to land on and take off from an aircraft carrier.

First woman to pilot a bomber across the North Atlantic (in 1941).

First civilian woman to receive the Distinguished Service Medal, for her leadership in creating and commanding the Women’s Air Force Service Pilots (WASPs), which transported military aircraft overseas during World War II.  Also a recipient of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

First woman to fly a jet aircraft across the Atlantic.

The only woman ever to be President of the Federation Aeronautique Internationale.

Five-time winner of the Harmon Trophy as the outstanding female aviator in the world.

Still holds more distance and speed records than any pilot living or dead, male or female.

Oh, yeah, and she worked as a test pilot for both Northrop and Lockheed, and was one of 13 women in the Mercury 13 Project, which considered the use of women as astronauts.  The candidates were not accepted for training, however, as NASA’s requirements for astronauts at the time were that they be military jet test pilots and hold engineering degrees.  In 1962, no women met both those requirements.

She was also a highly successful businesswoman, despite the lack of a formal education.  A lifelong Republican, she narrowly lost a bid for Congress, losing by only 3,199 votes to the first Asian-American Congressman, Democrat Dalip Singh Saund.  This was one of the few failures in her storied career.  (If you can call NOT being elected to Congress a failure.)

She devoted considerable time and money to charitable causes, particularly those assisting persons from impoverished backgrounds like her own.

And to top it off, she was pretty hawt:

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Gallery of the Intrepid – Pilot’s Edition

Monday, August 15th, 2011

Wiccapundit

Here is a cool 3D recreation of the U.S. Airways Flight 1549 ditching in the Hudson River, complete with audio.  When Captain Sullenberger takes the controls from the First Officer (who was flying the plane), he says calmly: “my airplane.”  No muss, no fuss; just quiet competence.  No panic; just getting the job done.

Well done, Captain.   Ever think of running for President?

h/t Ann Barnhardt

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A metaphor for the debt ceiling debate

Monday, July 18th, 2011

– Wiccapundit

This is a great excuse for me to post a flying video.  Think of this final approach and botched landing at St. Barts to be the Democrat approach to the debt ceiling debate:

 

This is how the approach should be done; “conservative style.” Notice how the pilot not only makes the landing, but is able to turn off at the first taxiway. It’s called competence.

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Humor at the expense of the TSA:

Tuesday, December 7th, 2010

Elphaba

The new TSA security rules have certainly “stimulated” a lot of creativity in the field of music.  Here’s one of the best TSA-related songs I’ve come across thus far.  It is probably not safe for work…don’t say that I didn’t warn ya:

Mock the TSA mercilessly…atta boys!

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Why I no longer fly commercial airlines

Monday, October 18th, 2010

– Wiccapundit

Sometimes I think taking the bus would be more pleasant:

Pilot to TSA: ‘No groping me and no naked photos.’

After passing through the same checkpoint for five years commuting to work as an airline pilot, this unfortunate individual finally ran afoul of the TSA brownshirts.  He refused to allow the TSA to use the new-fangled scanner that produces a nearly photographic representation of an individual’s nude body.  He then refused to have a TSA minion grope him in an “opt-out secondary screening.”   Read the article to follow the pathetic reasoning of the mindless TSA drones who were “just doing their jobs.”

The money quote:

[The TSA investigator] then briefed me on the recent screening policy changes and, apparently confused, asked whether they would be a problem for me. I stated that I did indeed have a problem with the infringement of my civil rights and liberty.

His reply: “That’s irrelevant.”

Q: What does TSA stand for?  A: “They Stand Around”

Q: How many TSA agents does it take to hold the floor down?  A: All of them.

It’s only a matter of time before  passengers boarding aircraft are required to bend over and spread their ass cheeks for the TSA probe.

via Lew Rockwell

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Gallery of the Intrepid – This is why we will eventually win.

Monday, September 6th, 2010

– Wiccapundit

The U.S. military can do things like this.  Our cave-dwelling enemies cannot.  We will win.

Watch especially at around 2:10.  The pilot is hovering at below ground level of rising terrain.  He perches the helicopter on the two rear wheels and lays the ramp right on the terraced ground.  Astonishing.  No, actually, just routine for these guys.

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Gallery of the Intrepid: Memorial Day – Thank a veteran

Monday, May 31st, 2010

– Wiccapundit

On this Memorial Day, it’s time to remember that the day is not about taking off from work and grilling a few burgers with friends.  It’s about acknowledging the sacrifices made by countless men and women who have served this nation in the military.  Here at Red State Witch, we have regular commenters who were former military (Sebastian) as well as those who are current military (James S.).  There may be others also whose service we are not aware of.  Elphaba and I express our extreme appreciation to all of you for your service.  We thank you more than we can express.

The painting above is a 75′ x 25′ mural in the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.  It was painted by the noted aviation artist Keith Ferris.  When viewed from the gallery in front of it, it is as if you were hanging in space 60 feet in front of the aircraft – a B-17 called Thunder Bird – during its bombing raid on a Luftwaffe airfield at Wiesbaden, Germany.  It is a extraordinary piece of work, and I never tire of seeing it (or the NASM) whenever I visit Washington.

I post this because I met the pilot of this aircraft.  He lived in my neighborhood, and when I was at his house once, I noticed some WWII memorabilia in his study.  I asked him what he had done in the war, and he said he had flown B-17s.  I mentioned how much I liked the Ferris mural of Thunder Bird, and he casually replied that he had been flying the aircraft on that raid.  He didn’t wear his service overtly or speak about it without prompting; to him it was simply a job he and his crew had to do. The average age of officers flying these aircraft in combat was about 21, and the average crewman’s age was maybe 19.  Simply amazing.

If you want to get a feel for how dangerous and difficult this “job” was, read Martin Caidin’s Flying Forts: The B-17 in World War II.  Some of the combat stories will curl your hair.

No matter what war, what theatre of operation, or what peacetime duty they have performed, anyone who has served our nation in uniform should be remembered this day.


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